The Town of Leura in the Blue Mountains

Leura is a picturesque town, in the Blue Mountains. While visiting the famous city of Sydney, most will pop the Blue Mountains on their to-do list, and why wouldn’t you? The lush landscape is swarming with native wildlife, breath-taking views, and an array of activities. With the valley overrun with mesmerizing mountaintops, regardless of your interests, you will certainly not be disappointed. But how do you get to this spectacular site?

This insanely popular destination provides visitors with a plethora of activities, from hiking to biking, to horse riding and even wine tasting. The village is full of life too, with sensational dining options, walking tours, and public gardens to visit. Many people flock to Leura in the summer months to take advantage of the town’s festivals and inspiring views. Visitors find time between shopping and eating around town to hiking some of the most incredible walks in Australia. Leura provides a great starting point to explore the Blue Mountains and their surroundings through nature walks, eco-tours, and self-guided adventures.

Leura

The History of Leura

The original inhabitants of the area were the Dharug people. Archaeological evidence at Lyrebird Dell in South Leura suggests that Aboriginal occupation of the region may date back more than 12,000 years, to a time when the climate was far arider than it is now.

The first Europeans to enter the area, in 1813, were the explorers Gregory Blaxland, William Lawson and William Charles Wentworth, their assistant James Burns (or Byrnes), a free man, and three unnamed convict servants who passed by sometime in late May 1813. They were followed by the expedition of George Evans in November 1813, the road-building party of William Cox the following year and then the thousands of travellers who passed to and from the west over the next 50 years.

When the western railway line was constructed across the Blue Mountains in 1867–68, a gatehouse (No 9) was erected where the line crossed the Western Road near the present Sorensen Bridge. The gatekeepers, chatting to the travellers waiting for the gates to open, were the first permanent European residents of the area now known as Leura. Another early presence occurred following the discovery of coal in the Jamison Valley below the present Leura golf course in the early 1880s. With the establishment of the Gladstone colliery, a siding was erected on the railway line in 1885 to service the mine. The colliery closed in 1887 and the gatehouse was eventually demolished during work to duplicate the railway line in 1901.

One of the town’s most popular must-see locations are the noteworthy Everglades Gardens. These gardens are a fantastic example of showcasing the local bush in the area, as well as the diverse design from international visions. The inspiration and design was created in the 1930’s by a Danish-born landscaper who took Australian local bush and paired it with European-style landscapes. With twelve and a half acres to roam, there’s a place in the garden for everyone. Pack a picnic lunch, visit a tearoom, or catch a play at the outdoor theatre, and experience the very popular gardens in all of its glory. The garden also hosts a Shakespeare festival over the summer months, showcases local artists in its very own gallery, and has acres of beautiful flowers.

What to See Here

Everglades Gardens

  • Everglades Gardens

    One of the town’s most popular must-see locations is the noteworthy Everglades Gardens. These gardens are a fantastic example of showcasing the local bush in the area, as well as the diverse design from international visions. The inspiration and design were created in the 1930s by a Danish-born landscaper who took Australian local bush and paired it with European-style landscapes. With twelve and a half acres to roam, there’s a place in the garden for everyone. Pack a picnic lunch, visit a tearoom, or catch a play at the outdoor theatre, and experience the very popular gardens in all of its glory. The garden also hosts a Shakespeare festival over the summer months, showcases local artists in its very own gallery, and has acres of beautiful flowers.

  • Sublime Point

    Another main attraction just outside of town is Sublime Point, Popular with photographers and hikers, this area offers up panoramic views of the Jamison Valley below. On a clear day, you can see the famous Three Sisters to the west.

  • The Bushwalks

    Leura has many great walks and views on its doorstep. These include Leura Cascades, Gordon Falls, Leura Forest, Sublime Point, Dardanelles Pass, Leura Falls, Jamison Lookout, the Pool of Siloam and Fortress Rock. Details about these walks and more can be viewed at the Wild Walks website and Blue Mountains Australia website.

  • The Town Leura Itself

    The town of Leura is also a fantastic weekend getaway from Sydney. Shopping is a highlight in this Edwardian-styled village, with unique boutiques and one-of-a-kind gifts. Some of the shops have even been converted from old cottages into single clothing stores. There is even a shop in a church! But shopping isn’t the only highlight of Leura. The food ranges from Indian to Japanese to casual cafes to fine dining with breathtaking views of the valley below. Leura is not only known as being a little town in the Blue Mountain region, but it also sets itself apart with its sense of style and comfort that cannot be copied.

The Events and Festivals

Leura Gardens Festival

  • Leura Gardens Festival

    Featuring glorious cool climate spring gardens, showcasing a particularly wide range of styles and sizes, and comprising new, returning and several old-favourite gardens. Situated in the beautiful Blue Mountains 100 kilometres west of Sydney, the gardens of Leura are famous for their magnificent displays of azaleas, rhododendrons, dogwoods, camellias and other cool-climate exotics, as well as flowering annuals, perennials and bulbs. The blaze of springtime colour in the gardens attracts visitors from all parts of Australia and overseas.

  • Yulefest

    Winter Magic is a sustainable, vibrant, annual community winter solstice celebration of the arts and creativity centred on Katoomba Street. The festival returns on 22 June 2019 with a new programme that showcases the creative talents of the Greater Blue Mountains. Instead of running a parade, organisers have decided to focus on a programme of community arts and street-based entertainment to ensure our community and our visitors have a magical day.

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